Dallington Forest Rare Insects Found

(Posted on behalf of Doug Edworthy )

Photo of wetland cranefly
Photo ©️ J. Salmela

Dallington Forest is home to so many treasures. A recent survey – Dallington Forest Saproxylic Invertebrate Sampling report – just published, has found a number of nationally rare and endangered species including a wetland cranefly Ellipteroides alboscutellatus (pictured here)  described in the report as “a remarkable discovery”

From April through October 2018, 150 species of insect were identified from sampling in Dallington Forest; 48 of the Coleoptera species, 37 of the Diptera and 2 Hemiptera were saproxylic – dependent on decaying wood, giving a total of 87 saproxylic species; 16 of the species trapped are of special note due to their rarity across Britain, and these comprise 5 Nationally Rare and 11 Nationally Scarce species.

The report by Ecological Consultant Dr. Keith Alexander was commissioned by Dallington Forest Project. It was funded by a grant from Sussex Lund, grant application assisted by the Woodland Trust, Ancients of the Future (a Buglife project funded by the heritage Lottery Fund) provided traps and materials, and Peter Chandler identified the Diptera.

A PDF copy of the report is available here:
Dallington Forest Saproxylic Invertebrate Sampling 2018 Keith Alexander

Saproxylic invertebrates are those invertebrates that are dependent on dead or decaying wood (or dependent on other organisms that are themselves dependent on dead wood). These invertebrates may not be dependent on the wood for their entire life cycle but at least some stage is dependent on wood.

A good example of this are the larvae of some beetles that feed on decaying wood. The adults may feed on other things (such as nectar).

Dead wood is an essential component of woodland ecosystems, but one that is often overlooked and cleared away as unsightly or on the grounds of safety or neatness. As a result, invertebrate species that rely on dead wood are now some of the most threatened in Britain. It is vital to retain a variety of dead wood habitats within the woodland. This includes standing trees, dead branches, stems and snags on living trees and fallen branches and stumps. A range of dead wood at all stages of decay will provide a range of habitats for more specialist saproxylic (dead wood) invertebrates.

See the following websites for more information about saproxylic invertebrates: –

https://www.buglife.org.uk/search?combine_2=saproxylic

http://ec.europa.eu/…/spec…/redlist/beetles/introduction.htm

https://www.amentsoc.org/insects/glossary/terms/saproxylic

Library Cafe and plant sale this Saturday 6th April

Just a reminder that the next Saturday opening of the Library Cafe in Dallington Old School Village Hall is this Saturday 6th April from 10-12. We will be including a plant sales table this month and each monthly Saturday session  throughout the summer and autumn. Please come along to buy or  bring any spare plants, seeds and garden produce.

April 2019 Parish news

(Posted on behalf of Bobbie Steel)
St Giles Church
Services in April

  • Sunday  7th April        11 am.       Service of The Word
  • Sunday 14th              6.30 pm.      Evensong
  • Sunday 21st.              11 am.           Easter Sunday Holy Communion
  • Sunday 28th.            9.30am.       Holy Communion

The World Day of Prayer service was held at Dallington on Friday March 1st. As well as members of the congregations in our benefice we were joined by friends from Heathfield. The service, which had been prepared by the women of Slovenia, was very thought-provoking, and the title, “Come, everything is ready”, welcomed and included all present.

History Group: the last two meetings of this Spring will be:
Wednesday April 10th  Jenny Stiles will talk about Dallington after 1066.
Wednesday April 24th Douglas Sewell (postponed from March) on Dallington’s war graves
Both meetings in the Old School from 7 for 7.30pm

Flower Club Angela has written a note about the Flower Club:
I am very sorry to say that, reluctantly, it has been decided to finish the monthly meetings. This is mainly due to the lack of support and interest. Looking back, we have learned a great deal and had many happy afternoons. I think it began some 8 or 9 years ago when Dorothy Messer approached Pam Fuller with the idea of starting a flower-arranging group locally. We have made large and miniature arrangements, used a kitchen utensil and a dustpan, made Harvest and Christmas wreaths, joined in with a couple of Flower-Festivals and learned to make Christmas arrangements to use at home. I also remember trying to make crepe-paper poppies, daffodils and anemones. How hopeless we were. Pam used to tell us that the Brownies she taught were much less awkward than us! Many thanks to Pam for all her help and enthusiasm over many happy Thursday afternoons.  Angela.

Dallington WI. At our February meeting we had the pleasure of listening to our neighbour, Robin Taylor, talking about the life and work of Elizabeth Bishop, a poet of whom he is very knowledgeable. We very much enjoyed hearing Robin share his interest.
In April we look forward to a return visit from Chris McCooey, with his talk entitled, ‘News from the Home Front’. The April meeting will be in the Old School Village Hall at 7.30pm on April 18th.
Please note the summer evening time and do not get caught out by arriving in the afternoon. Visitors are always very welcome.
Bobbie

Library Cafe As usual the Library Cafe is open in the Old School village hall every Monday (except Easter Monday) from 2-4. The monthly Saturday morning openings are April 6th and May 4th 10-12. We will be including a sales table for plants and produce in all Saturday sessions throughout the season – please bring along any spare plants, seeds and garden produce to swap or sell

Tree Warden advice about Ash Dieback

(Message posted on behalf of Doug Edworthy, Tree warden for Dallington and Brightling)

In February 2019 the Tree Council published an Action Plan Toolkit concerning Chalara (Ash Dieback disease) primarily aimed at authorities and big landowners.

While the Action Plan Toolkit might not be directly applicable to all parishioners of Brightling and Dallington, there are landholdings in the parishes containing a great number of Ash trees some of which are near to public roads, bridleways and footpaths and may pose a risk when they become infected.

The document also outlines the responsibilities and actions expected of local authorities and so it will provide a useful checklist against which our own local authorities’ performance can be monitored.

Please click on this link to access a summary of information from the ‘Toolkit’ that is relevant or of interest to people of our two parishes. Summary of Tree Council Toolkit

You can also download the full Toolkit here: https://www.treecouncil.org.uk/Ash-Dieback

Useful guide to tree pests and diseases

We’ve heard a lot about Ash Dieback Disease, but it’s not the only threat to our trees.

The Observatree project is designed to help us all to look out for and report signs of trouble. They explain:

“Working with the UK Plant Health Risk Group (the group that maintains the UK Plant Health Risk Register), Observatree has identified those pests and diseases which are of the highest concern at the moment. They are the ones:

  • most likely to arrive in the UK

• that have already arrived and we are concerned about their spread

  • which have the potential to cause the most serious and widespread impact on commercial forestry, amenity woodland and ecological systems”

You can find out more and download useful resources including spotters guides at their website at https://www.observatree.org.uk/tree-health/pests-and-diseases/ .

Ash Dieback.

(Posted on behalf of Doug Edworthy, Dallington Tree Warden)

The Tree Council has just published an Ash Dieback Action Plan Toolkit, and it makes sobering reading.

Every landowner should have the opportunity to learn about the impending dieback of their Ash woodland and the costs, financial and otherwise, that landowners will face.

It can be downloaded from the Tree Council’s page

https://www.treecouncil.org.uk/Ash-Dieback

History Group Talk 27th February 2019

The first History Group event of 2019 will take place on Wednesday 27th February in the Old School Village Hall at 7.30.

Roy Iremonger will be talking on”Policemen in Dallington”.

Please note that this year, all  talks will be on Wednesdays instead of Tuesdays as previously.

2019 programme
Wednesday  27th February Roy Iremonger:  Policemen in Dallington
Wednesday 13th March David Wilson: Pantons Cottage
Wednesday 27th March Douglas Sewell:  Dallington and the supernatural
Wednesday 10th April Jenny Stiles:  Dallington after 1066

The organisers wish this to be a social event; there is no admission charge but a small contribution towards expenses is welcome.

St Giles Churchyard closed for retiling works Friday 1st February

(Posted on behalf of Diana Day)

This coming Friday 1st February, there will be men in the churchyard replacing tiles on the roof. The churchyard will be closed for about 2 hours around lunchtime. This is to protect both the workmen and the public from any accident or mishap. Diana will be putting up “men at work” signs and will be around to redirect any visitors.