Possible compensation for recent extended power cut

Dallington residents who were affected by the recent extended power cut (from approximately 8.30 pm on Friday 2nd August to 11.30am on Saturday 3rd August) may be eligible for compensation.

Some residents have apparently already received a cheque for £75 but others may need to apply. Details at

https://www.ukpowernetworks.co.uk/internet/en/help-and-advice/need-help/can-i-claim-compensation-if-i-have-a-power-cut.html

or email care@ukpowernetworks.co.uk

News September 2019

(Posted on behalf of Bobbie Steel)

September St Giles Church services:
  • September 1st.              11am.             Service of The Word
  • September 8th.            6.30pm.       Evensong
  • September 15th.           11am.            Holy Communion
  • September 22nd.          9.30am.       Holy Communion
  • September 29th.          11am.            Service of The Word
    Dallington WI

    Our August meeting was in the form of a garden visit and cream tea. We chose Merriments because of its proximity and the number of flat paths on which less able members could walk easily. The weather was perfect, the garden looked beautiful and the tea was delicious.A very happy afternoon.
    At our September meeting Brian Freeland will be talking about  ‘Women of The Raj’. Visitors are always very welcome, Thursday September 19th, at 2pm in the Old School Village Hall.

    Old School Village Hall.

    The usual Saturday morning opening of the library/ cafe was somewhat interrupted by a power cut. The power had gone off in phases, starting with the first houses at 8pm on Friday, and everywhere was blacked out by 11pm. It was not restored until Saturday afternoon. Cakes which were in the oven in preparation for the cafe were ruined, so biscuits and cold drinks were on the menu. The Monday and Saturday sessions have been enhanced by the sale of produce and flowers from the school garden, so the lack of hot coffee was more than compensated for by the lovely bunches of sweet-peas.

Also in the village hall: Art Club – every Monday 10-12

Dallington News for August

(From Bobbie Steele)

St Giles Church Services in August
  • Sunday 4th      11am.           Service of The Word
  • Sunday 11th     6.30pm.      Evensong
  • Sunday 18th.      11am.             Holy Communion
  • Sunday  25th.      9.30am.        Holy Communion

The churchyard has been looking very beautiful.  Whilst keeping the grass cut in the main areas Douglas and David have left the wildflowers to the left of the path and  there has been a wonderful show of ox-eye daisies and other lovely flowers.We are very grateful to our two willing volunteers, it is a delight to walk through both of the resting places.

Charlotte and Nick have kindly offered to host an Opera and Supper Evening in aid of church funds. This will take place on Sunday, August 18th. More details from Charlotte.

In July the children will have had their Leavers’ Service in the church. We wish them all a happy holiday and send our good wishes to those who are going on to new schools. We hope they remember their times in St. Giles and the words they heard there.

The Old School Village Hall

The wine tasting evening was great fun and now the  committee are taking a summer break from fundraising, the next event is planned for September. More about that when dates etc. have been confirmed.

Womens Institute

The August meeting of Dallington W.I. will be a garden tea here at Staces. This will be to plan the year ahead. Visitors would be welcome. Thursday August 15th, 2pm at Staces , The Street.

Urgent message from Tree Council/Defra regarding oak trees

Message from the Tree Council and Defra forwarded via our tree warden, Doug Edworthy.

Tree Council logo“Dear Tree Wardens,
We’ve been asked by colleagues at Defra for your help with an urgent tree health matter concerning recent outbreaks of Oak Processionary Moth.

If you know anyone who has recently planted larger oaks (as defined in the press notice below) imported from the continent, Defra is requesting that they check these trees for OPM, and report any findings to Tree Alert. At this time of year, you are most likely to notice the hairy-looking caterpillar or web-like nests – please do not touch either as they could potentially be harmful to your health. Please find further guidance from Defra below, and for more information on the moth and its identification, visit Observatree or Forest Research. Thank you for your help in this important matter. Warm regards, The Tree Council Team”

———-

Copy of Press Notice:

“Horticulture industry urged to check for Oak Processionary Moth

Landscapers, nurseries, landowners and woodland managers are being urged to take action after the Plant Health Service intercepted a number of cases of Oak Processionary Moth caterpillars (OPM) on trees imported from the Netherlands.

Anyone who has planted larger oaks (defined below) imported from the continent should urgently check their trees for OPM and report any findings to TreeAlert. It is vital that these trees are checked now to minimise the spread of this damaging tree pest and protect the health of our oak trees.

OPM is an established pest in parts of London and surrounding areas, but the rest of the country is designated as a Protected Zone. Swift action is being taken by the Plant Health Service to eradicate recent findings of OPM in Hampshire, Warwickshire and Gloucestershire, including surveillance, tracing work and destruction of both the caterpillars and infested trees. The Plant Health Service have also announced an urgent review of import controls on oaks.

OPM caterpillars feed on oak leaves and can increase trees’ vulnerability to attack by other pests and diseases, making them less able to withstand weather conditions such as drought and floods. The cases highlight the need for continued vigilance from industry and government to protect the UK’s trees.

Dr Anna Brown, Head of Tree Health & Contingency Planning, Forestry Commission, said: “Those of us involved in importing or trading plants must maintain our vigilance against exotic pests and diseases such as OPM. There is a lot we can do such as buying British, only buying stock from reputable, responsible suppliers and inspecting imported plants.

“Inspect, inspect and inspect again – we can’t check imported plants too often for signs of trouble. Don’t presume that because your supplier found no evidence of a pest or disease that you won’t either. You might spot something that they have missed.”

The Forestry Commission, councils and land managers tackle the pest with an annual control programme of tree treatment. Increased measures to protect the country from the spread of OPM were introduced in 2018. Restrictions on the import of most species of oak into England have also been introduced as part of these regulations to protect native trees.

Professor Nicola Spence, Defra Chief Plant Health Officer, said: “Since 2012 we have invested more than £37 million in tree health research, including a dedicated programme of research and development on oak.

“We will continue to work with local authorities and land managers to tackle OPM with a control programme of treatment and surveillance.  In 2018, we introduced tighter restrictions on the importation of oak trees to England but are now looking at options to strengthen these even further.

“The Plant Health Service has received reports of an exceptional expansion of the OPM population in parts of Europe, due the hot weather experienced last year.”

If you suspect OPM, you should not attempt to destroy or move infected material yourself as the nests and caterpillars can pose some risks to human health. For more on how to identify OPM, visit https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/opm.

Further information:Larger oaks are defined here as those with a girth >8cm at 1.2m above the root collar.
To report sightings of pests and diseases, use the TreeAlert online portal: https://treealert.forestresearch.gov.uk/
The Plant Health Service is made up of Defra, Animal and Plant Health Agency and the Forestry Commission.
For more on OPM, visit: https://www.forestresearch.gov.uk/tools-and-resources/pest-and-disease-resources/oak-processionary-moth-thaumetopoea-processionea/
For guidance on importing trees and plants to England and Wales from the EU visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/importing-trees-and-plants-to-england-and-wales-from-the-eu
To find out more about plant health Protected Zones visit: https://planthealthportal.defra.gov.uk/resources/plant-health-protected-zones/
To find out how the government will work with others to protect England’s tree population from pest and disease threats, see the Tree Health Resilience Strategy: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/tree-health-resilience-strategy-2018.
The Plant Health and Seeds Inspectorate (PHSI) is part of the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) and implements and enforces plant health policy in England, and in Wales on behalf of the Welsh Government. For more information on plant health controls, visit: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/plant-health-controls

Village Cricket 13th July 2019

Dallington Village Cricket

6-a-Side Cricket at the Sugar Loaf Field, Woods Corner.
From 2pm, Saturday, 13th July, 2019

Photo of cricketerFamilies and Friends are invited to play 6-a-side or take part in some Clock Golf — but don’t miss out on the ‘phenomenal’ cricket tea! (Cakes and sandwiches are most welcome).

Remember a chilled white to add a little something to the proceedings.
Contact….Douglas Sewell (01435 830304)

Ringing Remembers

(Posted on behalf on Diana Day)

Over the past few years we have all been thinking about WW1. At Dallington tower we rang to commemorate the 100 years since the Armistice and Peace in 1918, on 11/11/2018.

A ringer from Rainham in Kent designed this badge for all ringers to wear in future years especially on Remembrance Day. We have put our orders in and await the arrival. Diana DayBadge

Dallington Forest Rare Insects Found

(Posted on behalf of Doug Edworthy )

Photo of wetland cranefly
Photo ©️ J. Salmela

Dallington Forest is home to so many treasures. A recent survey – Dallington Forest Saproxylic Invertebrate Sampling report – just published, has found a number of nationally rare and endangered species including a wetland cranefly Ellipteroides alboscutellatus (pictured here)  described in the report as “a remarkable discovery”

From April through October 2018, 150 species of insect were identified from sampling in Dallington Forest; 48 of the Coleoptera species, 37 of the Diptera and 2 Hemiptera were saproxylic – dependent on decaying wood, giving a total of 87 saproxylic species; 16 of the species trapped are of special note due to their rarity across Britain, and these comprise 5 Nationally Rare and 11 Nationally Scarce species.

The report by Ecological Consultant Dr. Keith Alexander was commissioned by Dallington Forest Project. It was funded by a grant from Sussex Lund, grant application assisted by the Woodland Trust, Ancients of the Future (a Buglife project funded by the heritage Lottery Fund) provided traps and materials, and Peter Chandler identified the Diptera.

A PDF copy of the report is available here:
Dallington Forest Saproxylic Invertebrate Sampling 2018 Keith Alexander

Saproxylic invertebrates are those invertebrates that are dependent on dead or decaying wood (or dependent on other organisms that are themselves dependent on dead wood). These invertebrates may not be dependent on the wood for their entire life cycle but at least some stage is dependent on wood.

A good example of this are the larvae of some beetles that feed on decaying wood. The adults may feed on other things (such as nectar).

Dead wood is an essential component of woodland ecosystems, but one that is often overlooked and cleared away as unsightly or on the grounds of safety or neatness. As a result, invertebrate species that rely on dead wood are now some of the most threatened in Britain. It is vital to retain a variety of dead wood habitats within the woodland. This includes standing trees, dead branches, stems and snags on living trees and fallen branches and stumps. A range of dead wood at all stages of decay will provide a range of habitats for more specialist saproxylic (dead wood) invertebrates.

See the following websites for more information about saproxylic invertebrates: –

https://www.buglife.org.uk/search?combine_2=saproxylic

http://ec.europa.eu/…/spec…/redlist/beetles/introduction.htm

https://www.amentsoc.org/insects/glossary/terms/saproxylic